Samsung LED HDTV

in Samsung

If you've not been watching the television market regularly, you'll probably be in for a surprise when it comes time to purchase a television. A Samsung LED HDTV will eventually be the choice that you arrive at, if you do your homework.

Obviously you've seen HDTV, DLP, LED, LCD, Plasma, Projection, and many other acronyms and descriptions that you may or may not understand. The manufacturers don't just put these tags on their equipment to confuse you, there's just a lot happening in the world of HDTV.

I mentioned buying a Samsung LED HDTV for a reason, actually for several reasons. We all obviously want the best image reproduction possible when purchasing a television. When you buy an HDTV you are getting the best possible resolution if you purchase a 1080p device, but that doesn't mean the actually image being displayed is gong to be the best, only that the amount of data (pixels) used to generate the image is the best you can buy. Even a 1080i image uses the same data, but it refreshes differently.

When/If you buy a Samsung LED HDTV, you're also ensuring that you've also bought a screen that is capable of producing the best image possible with all of that data.

Most people have heard of plasma displays, and they do offer a good picture, but they also have a relatively short life expectancy, and can't produce an image comparable to a new Samsung LED HDTV.

So, what is all the hype about ? LEDs (light emitting diodes) have been around for a long time. However, it hasn't been until fairly recently that they have been advanced to the point they can now be used in higher power applications. Now they're used in street lights traffic control lights, flashlights, automotive lights (brake lights etc.), and now in HDTV displays, just to name but a very few applications.

The reason Samsung is mentioned exclusively in this article, is because Samsung is completely dominating the LED HDTV world presently. They were in the lead developing the technology and they have not slowed down one bit in developing one fantastic Samsung LED HDTV after another.

So, whether you're looking for a DLP device, or maybe an LCD television, I would look seriously at a Samsung LED HDTV. With the LED technology, you can have an image that is up to 40% brighter, colors that are so much more vibrant, and blacks that are truly black.

Do your research before spending such a large sum of money, although the new LED HDTVs are very affordable. Know that if you buy a DLP set that isn't LED powered, you'll be replacing the light sources after a few years. Understand that when you buy an LCD HDTV that doesn't use LED technology, that you'll be getting a display that can be slow to respond to fast moving images, displays dark grays instead of blacks (Samsung has up to a 500,000:1 contrast ratio), and may have color 'bleeding.' It may look very acceptable, until it's compared directly to a Samsung LED HDTV.

Soon the industry standard will be utilizing LED technology as the primary light source in HDTVs. There is however, no reason to wait, unlike plasma technology for instance, don't expect the drastic price cuts on any Samsung LED HDTV. That's because they are using an older technology that has been advanced. You won't be paying for all of the research and development. Of course the same can be said of any of the major manufacturer's devices also.

Sony, as you would expect, is also becoming a player in the LED TV field, but, as in most of their other products, they are generally priced substantially higher than other similar HDTVs. There are also other brands entering the market, but it is being dominated by Samsung.

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Jeffrey Norris has 1 articles online

Go take a look at any Samsung LED HDTV, with all of the awesome features available, such as instant online content, and widgets available to make interfacing with the Internet so easy and enjoyable, you'll surely find the ideal Samsung LED HDTV to fit your needs...and your budget.

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Samsung LED HDTV

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This article was published on 2010/04/03